Tag: writingtips

43. Interview with Sinead Hamill

This week we have author Sinead Hamill, author of ‘Scumbags and Handbags’, ‘Smiling Vendetta’ and the soon to be published ‘Dippers’. Sinead talks about her decision to self-publish, where her inspiration comes from and the drive she has to write (and of course have the craic). We talk life, death and ditties!

Sinead’s book Dippers is available now.

This episode was presented and produced by Máire Brophy

Call for interviewees 2017

We’re on hiatus at the moment, but we’ll be returning soon and we’re looking for interesting writers to interview for the podcast in 2017. So far we’ve had some great interviewees: Oran Doyle, Roland Evans, Catherine Ryan Howard, Caitriona Lally and Kevin Curran, and they’ve given us great insight and interesting things to think about when exploring our own work, as well as interesting things to read!

If you’d like to come on the podcast and talk about your experience as a writer or author please email us irishwriterspodcast@gmail.com. We’re happy to talk to writers from anywhere, but as we’re a chatty podcast we like to be in the same room – so if you’re based in Dublin or just passing through we’d love to talk to you!

 

35. Fan Fiction and Ghostwriting

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In this episode Cathy brings up the topic of fan fiction. Are we fans of fan fiction?

There are some authors who have gone beyond influence to actually imitating well-known authors. We discuss the tension of finding your own voice while being influenced by the masters. 

We also put some what if questions out there about ghostwriting, and see who are the takers and who are not! 

Presented by Máire Brophy, Kate Mulholland and Cathy Clarke. Produced by Kate Mulholland.

NaNoWriMo

Hi all,

We’re half way through November and Kate and I are joining in with #NaNoWriMo this year. In case you’re unfamiliar, NaNoWriMo stands for National Novel Writing Month, and it’s the time of year where writers power through to get a first draft of that novel they’ve been meaning to write. The challenge is to write 50,000 word in 30 days.

I think the biggest benefit of NaNo is the community. The site allows you to set up a profile, connect with buddies and get access to coaches and prompts, and you can find people talking about it in all the usual social media sites. If you’ve been listening to the podcast, you’ll know I set up a profile. You can become my buddy here. We discuss NaNo on the podcast throughout the month, so if you’re getting involved too let us know.

nanograph
As the ancient saying goes ‘people reserve the strongest feelings of love and hate for graphs’

As you may know, I’m currently having a love-hate relationship with the graph the site provides. I’ve never been ahead of it, and catching up to it seems increasingly difficult, but without it I doubt I would have written so much already. It’s been fun so far and writing a first draft is definitely better than editing!

Maire

8. Have we learned anything at all?

In this episode we discuss how sparks of ideas end up as written stories, what we look for in ideas to  make them into stories, and ponder how we picked the subject or if the subject picked us. This segued neatly into talking about what we would do differently knowing what we now know, and how we’ve obviously developed the perfectly streamlined process by now… probably… or maybe not.

7. Name calling and a writing update

This week we gave a writing update to see how far we had come since the pilot episode, and what were the obstacles in the way.

We then flowed into the thorny subject of naming characters, places and sometimes things. The question of using nicknames or borrowing the associations of distinctive names was .. well, not really answered to tell the truth (!) but they were both discussed.